altlitgossip:

Micheal J. Seidlinger’s new novel ‘Mother of a Machine Gun’ is now out on Lazy Fascist Press — get your copy here
I’m right in the middle of reading this, and it’s an unpredictible mindfuck in the best possible way — Seidlinger is a true literary astronaut
in a couple weeks I’ll be writing a review of this book, along with the other great novel that Seidlinger released this year 'The Fun We've Had'
go put some Seidlinger in your brain, aw hell yeah

altlitgossip:

Micheal J. Seidlinger’s new novel ‘Mother of a Machine Gun’ is now out on Lazy Fascist Press — get your copy here

I’m right in the middle of reading this, and it’s an unpredictible mindfuck in the best possible way — Seidlinger is a true literary astronaut

in a couple weeks I’ll be writing a review of this book, along with the other great novel that Seidlinger released this year 'The Fun We've Had'

go put some Seidlinger in your brain, aw hell yeah

altlitgossip:

Blake Butler on Timothy Willis Sander’s new novel ‘Matt Meets Vik’:
Much of Sanders’s power comes from the way he wields unvarnished thought. His narration often meanders between non-sequitur observations that most writers would keep to themselves and clear, declarative impressions of people and places that don’t necessarily contribute to any concrete plot goal, but at the same time provide a unique ambient tone. By way of example, here’s a patently Sanders trio of sentences: ‘Matt parked the Isuzu Trooper. He thought, “My SUV,” and pictured George W. Bush saying, “Terrorism.” He stared at the Isuzu logo on the steering wheel and thought, “One term president. Or everything is over for humanity.”’ For once, I understand. There is something made apparent about existence simply through pairing cultural detritus with emotional tone, the redundancy of having to go on being a person every day surrounded by whatever you are surrounded by, looking for meaning.
plus an excerpt from the novel
read it here

altlitgossip:

Blake Butler on Timothy Willis Sander’s new novel ‘Matt Meets Vik’:

Much of Sanders’s power comes from the way he wields unvarnished thought. His narration often meanders between non-sequitur observations that most writers would keep to themselves and clear, declarative impressions of people and places that don’t necessarily contribute to any concrete plot goal, but at the same time provide a unique ambient tone. By way of example, here’s a patently Sanders trio of sentences: ‘Matt parked the Isuzu Trooper. He thought, “My SUV,” and pictured George W. Bush saying, “Terrorism.” He stared at the Isuzu logo on the steering wheel and thought, “One term president. Or everything is over for humanity.”’ For once, I understand. There is something made apparent about existence simply through pairing cultural detritus with emotional tone, the redundancy of having to go on being a person every day surrounded by whatever you are surrounded by, looking for meaning.

plus an excerpt from the novel

read it here

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