If Only the Names Were Changed by Andrew Miller

ISBN: 978-1-937865-70-2
186 pages
Release Date: June 28, 2016
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Publicity Interest

I embrace shame like a scalpel and eviscerate my ego and empty myself of any concept of who I am, who I was; filling the void with self-deprecation. For Immanuel Kant, only if you have the freedom to choose to do the right thing, the moral thing, the thing that every single human is capable of, can you then be moral. I wonder if I’ll ever be free. Sequence of exponential numbers unable, unwilling to deviate from the pattern. Begins with one, then two, then broadens as it uncoils. I’m filled with such guilt, such shame. I’m unwilling to deviate from the pattern. I wonder if I’ll ever be moral. I wonder if I’ll ever be free. I wonder if I’ll ever be free. If I’ll ever be free.

“With evocative and compelling prose, Andrew Miller’s If Only The Names Were Changed melds the personal and the political, first-hand introspection on mental illness and drug abuse with poetic digressions and anti-authoritarian screeds. While slim in size, it is ambitious in scope, that rare book with something actually on the line, that goes for broke and wins.”

–Eric Obenauf, co-publisher of Two Dollar Radio

“Andrew Miller’s If Only the Names Were Changed is the immensity of self turned into sharp, dangerous literature. The world/mirror inside the author has been dissected and is being offered for consumption, but not without a warning: this is brutal, sad writing that’s been touched by death, drugs, booze, heartache, and enough uncertainty and self doubt to make it as venomous as it is necessary, powerful, and true.”
–Gabino Iglesias, author of Zero Saints
“Unflinchingly honest, Andrew Miller’s stories are akin to Francis Bacon portraiture. Mixed in with all of life’s brutality and banality are moments of astounding beauty that echo the angelic opening to Damien Rice’s song It Takes A Lot To Know A Man.”
–Scott Navicky, author of Humboldt: Or, the Power of Positive Thinking

“Politics, religion, sexuality, society and psychology: Miller is unapologetic and brutally honest, galloping through it all at such a speed as will leave you breathless. There are moments when he is almost unforgivingly intellectual, moments of thunderous untempered rage and moments of poetic sublime.”
–Emily Ruck Keene, editor of Paris Lit Up